Honey Grevillea – traditional Indigenous food

$2,900.00

Contemporary Indigenous artist Susan Pitjara Hunter celebrates the flowering of the bush honey grevillea in this painting. The grevillea is an important part of their traditional diet and is still enjoyed and celebrated today. The people harvest and consume traditional foods – and to some extent medicines – especially the elders. The plant is especially prolific on Utopia after the winter rains. The flowers contain thick, honey-like nectar which can be sucked directly from the flowers. The Alywarre people also soak the flowers in water to make a sweet cordial-like drink.

Susan Hunter’s inspiration for her paintings is derived from her knowledge of Awely or women’s business which are ceremonies associated with women’s social structure and ritual knowledge. Sourcing food and women’s role as the provider is an important part of Awely.

Susan Pitjara Hunter (also known as Susie) is one of the most gifted artists of this region. Susan has always had a deep sense of belonging to her country and has remained steadfastly a bush woman.
Her meticulous execution of Women’s Business is rendered with extreme care and respect for her subject matter.

Her work is held in the following collections:

• National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
• National Gallery of Victoria
• Robert Holmes a Court Collection, Perth

Born circa 1966 into the Alyawarr tribe, Susan Pitjara Hunter is the younger sister of artists Annie, Jessie and Sandy. Susan lives on her Homelands Ngkwarlananima outstation in the central desert region.

Code: EDA-SH1805/19
Region: Utopia, Northern Territory
Vendor: Eastern Desert Art
Medium: Polymer acrylic on Belgian linen
Size: 91 cm x 121 cm

Description

Contemporary Indigenous artist Susan Pitjara Hunter celebrates the flowering of the bush honey grevillea – traditional Indigenous food-  in this painting. The grevillea is an important part of their traditional diet and is still enjoyed and celebrated today. The people harvest and consume traditional foods – and to some extent medicines – especially the elders. The plant is especially prolific on Utopia after the winter rains. The flowers contain thick, honey-like nectar which can be sucked directly from the flowers. The Alywarre people also soak the flowers in water to make a sweet cordial-like drink.

Susan Hunter’s inspiration for her paintings is derived from her knowledge of Awely or women’s business which are ceremonies associated with women’s social structure and ritual knowledge. Sourcing food and women’s role as the provider is an important part of Awely.

Susan Pitjara Hunter (also known as Susie) is one of the most gifted artists of this region. Susan has always had a deep sense of belonging to her country and has remained steadfastly a bush woman.
Her meticulous execution of Women’s Business is rendered with extreme care and respect for her subject matter.

Her work is held in the following collections:

• National Gallery of Australia, Canberra
• National Gallery of Victoria
• Robert Holmes a Court Collection, Perth

Born circa 1966 into the Alyawarr tribe, Susan Pitjara Hunter is the younger sister of artists Annie, Jessie and Sandy. Susan lives on her Homelands Ngkwarlananima outstation in the central desert region.